The Veterinarian With Heart

The west, in particular the United States, is becoming an increasingly pet-centric society. 67% of American households own a pet, compared to 56% of households in 1988. We go all-out in taking care of our furry friends, providing them with a level of care and tenderness other cultures typically reserve for small children or members of the family.

A part of this care involves making sure that their most important organ, their heart, is well maintained and healthy over their lifetimes. Unfortunately, heart problems are relatively common in a number of dogs, either due to their lifestyles, genetics, or even their breed.

Heart conditions usually surface in one of two ways: chronic valvular disease, which involves a leaky valve that reduces the quantity of blood that can be pumped around their bodies, or myocardial disease, in which a weakening or thickening of the heart muscle reduces the efficacy of the organ. These two conditions are attributed to a number of factors, including weight, age, and the breed of the dog. Smaller dogs typically suffer from chronic valvular disease, while larger dogs suffer from myocardial disease.

In heart disease, the best treatment is prevention, and prevention for dogs involves a lot of exercise and a healthy diet. Exercise is a given, and it’s abundantly clear that we as people also often don’t get anywhere near enough of it ourselves considering the rate at which we are diagnosed with heart disease. Taking your dog on runs, short bike rides, and walks at least once a day is absolutely essential in keeping their hearts pumping normally.

Diet is also a key factor many people tend to forget, considering how happy our dogs are to munch away on pretty much anything that escapes the kitchen table and rolls onto the floor. While they are a continually gluttonous bunch, making sure your dogs are getting food that is not too high in sodium and adding in some home made meals like ground meat and organs will make a positive difference in your pet’s health.

One of the best preventative measures is finding a good veterinarian who can screen your pet for early signs of cardiac issues. Cardiac and cardiothoracic specialized veterinary consultants can find symptoms such as palpitations and fluid build-ups early and give you the appropriate routines and diet advice to make sure you keep your furry pal for as long as possible.

Since we are a small business publication, we’d be remiss in not recommending a fantastic local cardiac specialist vet for our southern California readers who are looking for the best in show. That’s why we’re spotlighting Cardiac Vet, a veterinarian office based in Marina Del Rey who has been winning awards for their top-of-the-line pet heart care for over a decade.

From chihuahuas to great danes, Cardiac Vet will give you not only the appropriate medications and treatments, but also a full lifestyle regimen to ensure your pet’s heart is as healthy and long-lasting as possible. If you think your pet might be suffering from one of the aforementioned conditions, or if you just want a brief consultation, contact them today. Your pet may hate going to the vet, but you’ll be secure in the knowledge that their heart is in good hands.

Cardiac Vet

(323) 393-0616

Marina del Rey, CA 90292

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